The Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress has awarded four contractor members of the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) with prestigious Gold Circle Awards during NRCA’s 131st Annual Convention held Feb. 6-8 in New Orleans. The award recognizes outstanding workmanship and contributions to the roofing industry, including unique roofing-related jobs, programs and services. Additionally, one company received a Gold Circle Safety Award for demonstrating superior safety measures.
The 2018 Gold Circle Award winners are:
Outstanding Workmanship: Low-slope
Klein Contracting Corp., Doraville, Ga., won for its work on the AT&T Midtown Center, a prominent high-rise building in midtown Atlanta. Workers had to overcome several access challenges, including using only two freight elevators in each building that also serviced all delivery and moving needs for all floors. Klein Contracting workers mechanically fastened a Dexcell cement cover board to the deck; installed two layers of high-density 2-inch polyisocyanurate insulation laid in low-rise foam; installed ½-inch high-density cover board laid in low-rise foam; adhered 60-mil-thick TPO membrane; and installed an additional drain. On the support building, workers installed a tapered Celcore lightweight insulating concrete; adhered 115-mil-thick fleece-backed TPO membrane in low-rise foam; and installed walk pads. Klein Contracting’s designs for both buildings allowed the new roof systems to meet current energy code and also allowed the manufacturer to issue a 20-year No Dollar Limit (NDL) warranty.
 
Outstanding Workmanship: Steep-slope
American Roofing & Metal Co. Inc. and Steinrock Roofing and Sheet Metal, Louisville, Ky., won for their work on the Fayette County Courthouse, Lexington, Ky.  American Roofing & Metal performed the renovation to the slate roof and supporting structure and contracted Steinrock Roofing and Sheet Metal to restore the intricate copper components of the upper and lower cupola and dome of the courthouse. American Roofing & Metal workers repaired the roof system deck by installing a ¾-inch-thick layer of plywood and then applied a polymer-modified bitumen base sheet to serve as a protective underlayment. The crew then installed two layers of 2-inch-thick polyisocyanurate insulation over the newly repaired deck. Because the dome had a nearly vertical face, installing the new slate roof system was a challenge. American Roofing & Metal workers installed 1 X 4s vertically from top to bottom using two screws at every other angle iron. The 1 x 4s were spaced 24 inches on center horizontally and a second 1 x 4 was glued and screwed over the first. Three layers of 3/8-inch-thick plywood then were installed. American Roofing & Metal workers also installed an underlayment and Buckingham Slate.

 
Steinrock Roofing and Sheet Metal workers built a full-scale replica of the base of the cupola and built wooden jigs to reproduce the moldings and corbels. The molding of the cupola consisted of 653 hand-cut, curved pieces that were assembled using tinners rivets. The cupola was clad using soft copper in flat-locked panels to replicate the original construction. Another mold was made to reproduce 260 feet of the ornamental hip cap for the dome’s slate roof. A total of 840 linear feet of cornice gutter was fabricated and installed using 20-ounce copper. To complete the total restoration of the cupola, 10, 700 pounds of copper were used, which was transported and installed at the job site using two-man crews. In addition, Steinrock Roofing and Sheet Metal reproduced the 170-pound landmark weathervane that had been removed from the building during the 1990s. Once it was completed, the weathervane had to be mounted on a blustery December day where temperatures dipped below 27 F and winds were 12-15 mph. In the end, after more than two decades of absence, the landmark running horse now spins atop the courthouse.
 
Innovative Solutions: New Construction
Flynn Southwest LP, Commerce City, Colo., won for its work on the University of Denver’s Daniel Feliz Richie School of Engineering and Computer Science. The structure included a dome with diamond-like shingles, standing-seam copper roof panels, and copper diamond and flat-seam wall panels.  Flynn Southwest was presented with the challenge of designing the diamond-like shingles, which included the complicated task of calculating the shingles to fall within the tolerances left behind by the other trades working on the project. This was accomplished by designing the shingles with an interlocking system in which each shingle could be adjusted to maintain the concentric lines that gave the dome its signature look. On the roof system, Flynn Southwest workers installed 5/8-inch-thick gypsum board; 4.5-inch Atlas Nailbase; Carlisle WIP 300 HT Ice and Water Shield; Interwrap Titanium UDL Synthetic Underlayment; 16-ounce double-rolled, mechanically seamed Revere Copper; and Tra-Mage C21Z single-bar snow-retention system. On the dome, workers installed Carlisle WIP 300 HT Ice and Water Shield; Interwrap Titanium UDL 50 Synthetic Underlayment and 16-ounce Revere Zinc Coated Freedom Gray custom-made shingles.
 
Innovative Solutions: Reroofing
Wagner Roofing Co., Hyattsville, Md., won for its work on the Bethesda Metro Center, Bethesda, Md. The project involved removing and replacing a 35-year-old insulated translucent skylight system 16 stories above the lobby of the Washington Area Metropolitan Transit Administration transportation hub in downtown Bethesda. The project called for the removal of all 200 individual insulating fiberglass panels and reuse of the existing framing system. Of the 200 panels in need of replacement, there were nearly 100 different dimensioned panels and shapes that would be required. Wagner Roofing worked with Kemper System Inc. and Curtainwall Design Consultants to develop a new liquid-applied reinforced polymer membrane waterproofing system that integrated properly with the adjacent skylight. Wagner Roofing also designed and fabricated a new two-stage gutter system. After the existing exterior gutter system was removed, the remaining interior aluminum gutter was prepared and treated with Kemper’s 2K-PUR system. The top exterior gutter was replaced with new .063-mil-thick finished aluminum. The base of the waterproofing system was applied in the shop before being sent to the worksite for installation and top coat application. Wagner Roofing workers applied a temporary vapor barrier to the main lower built-in gutter before installing a new tapered polyisocyanurate insulation system and new heat-welded 80-mil-thick TPO membrane. The same two-stage flashing treatment was applied to the main gutter, and new scuppers were cut through the precast concrete wall to more effectively move water away from the building. Workers then replaced all custom-fabricated field panels and tied into the new perimeter systems.
 
Safety Preparedness and Performance
Wagner Roofing Co., Hyattsville, Md., also won the award for Safety Preparedness and Performance for the great steps the company to overcome the significant public safety challenge of providing access for employees to work on the skylight and adjacent systems, enabling building operations to continue during their work on the Bethesda Metro Center. The company partnered with Scaffold Resource to develop a permanent hoist from the building’s loading dock. This permitted safe passage of debris and materials. A 160-foot-tall scaffold to support the mechanical hoist was erected on the exterior of the building and tied back to the floor slab edges. At the building’s 12th floor, one skylight panel was removed to permit access to the underside of the skylight. A cable system then was installed to enable netting to be hung like a curtain to catch any falling tools or debris. The scaffolding on the outside of the building was staged on the 12th floor, passing through the temporary opening in the skylight. The scaffold system was then suspended from the space from of the atrium by rated webbed beam straps and chains, providing safe and sturdy access for workers to the underside of the skylight system.
 

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